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Before you take on any challenge - whether you are planning a trip to someplace exotic, or contemplating a career change, or whatever - there is always a step you will do first if it is available to you: You'll ask other people how they did it. You probably won't follow the same playbook as those who went before, but knowing how others approached the same challenge, and how it turned out, will narrow your choices. And that can help a lot.

After Dilbert became a big deal, people started asking how I was able to beat such long odds. Was it simply a case of hard work plus extraordinary luck, or did I have some sort of secret method?

The interesting answer is that my career unfolded according to a written strategy that I created after I graduated from college. I still have it. And on top of the strategy I have several systems designed to make it easier for luck to find me.

Last year I realized that my personal story has just the right amount of twists and setbacks to make good reading. So I turned it into a book that will come out in October on the topic of success. The title is How to Fail Almost Every Time and Still Win Big: Kind of the Story of My Life. It's a non-Dilbert book that includes humor in some chapters, but it's mostly a very different approach to the topic of success. I wouldn't expect anyone to follow my systems and get the same results, but I think it is helpful to know which methods other people have tried and how it turned out for them.

Anyway, my publisher asked me about getting blurbs for the back cover. In publishing lingo, a blurb is a recommendation or positive review of the book that appears on the back cover, as in "A fantastic read. I couldn't put it down. - Joe Blow."

My problem with collecting blurbs in the usual way is that it feels like assigning homework to strangers. A typical blurb process might involve picking some famous authors in the success field and asking my publisher to ask their publishers to ask the famous authors to 1) Read my book, and 2) Write glowing reviews. The whole process feels wrong.

This is where you come in.

My publisher has agreed to print blurbs from you, my blog readers, knowing that none of you have read the actual book. What's in it for you is that you might see your name on the back cover of the book.

The trick is to write your review in a way that addresses my general writing/thinking qualities as seen on this blog. You won't be reviewing the book so much as reviewing me as a writer. Keep your reviews to a few sentences at most, and don't be so overboard that it looks disingenuous. The trick is to say something positive that isn't over the top. And don't pretend you actually read the book.

I'll select several winners from what I see in the comments and stick them on the book.

Who's in?

 
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Jun 8, 2013
The truth of the matter is that Scott Adams became successful like 99% of successful people do it: by working insanely hard for a long, long time. Most people don't want to hear that, though, so he's written an amusingly inaccurate version of his journey to give the reader comfort, false hope, and some laughs along the way. Heck, reading this book is easier than going out and actually accomplishing something, so why wouldn't you buy it?
 
 
Jun 8, 2013
Scott Adams has elevated irony into an art form, falling in that range somewhere between a paint-by-numbers book and photographs of city skylines: sometimes obvious yet strangely compelling. Like any good self-help book, he makes success seem easier than it is. A great book for learning how someone not at all like yourself made it big.
 
 
+1 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 8, 2013
Scott Adams is never afraid to go out on a limb, even though his fans are notorious for always carrying a hacksaw in their Dogbert-branded back packs. -- Brant
 
 
Jun 8, 2013
Scott's sage advice is great, mindless humor for 90 percent of the induhviduals out there, but for those smart enough to steal the book, it contains helpful ancedotes on their way to the top.
 
 
Jun 8, 2013


The (un)serious for the (un)serious.
 
 
Jun 8, 2013
All the other books about success involve some variation of working really hard.
Scott Adams never did that in his live and still got highly successful.
I say you should buy this book.
 
 
Jun 8, 2013
I'M ON A BOOK! A BOOK BY A GUY WHO'S FAMOUS, SORT OF! TAKE THAT, MR. NAME ON A LOUSY PLAQUE THEY DON'T EVEN KEEP IN THE TROPHY CASE ANY MORE! YOU TOO, MISS BIG COLOR PHOTO IN THE YEARBOOK!
-- Cliff.
Basketball (Assistant Equipment Manager), Checkers Club, Future Retail Clerks
 
 
Jun 8, 2013
You probably won't learn what the key to success is from this book, but since failure is the successful elimination of one possible conclusion, you may just learn what isn't.

-Adam Jacobson
 
 
Jun 8, 2013
If you are not Scott Adams then you should buy this book. Mr. Adams shows Morticia how to get Wednesday and Pugsly to trick Uncle Fester.. - sorry, wrong Adams. Scott shows us how to be successful in spite of ourselves and that wrong turns can be right turns after all! Funny and educational. This book can change your life!
 
 
Jun 7, 2013
Scott Adams is not Bruce Schneier. One is depressing, yet usually accurate, the other's often funny, and you should take everything with two grans of salt.
 
 
+5 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
Scott Adams proves that even a blind blind squirrel can occasionally find a nut.
 
 
Jun 7, 2013
In this book Scott Adams does what he does best; throwing a wrench into the gears of conventional wisdome and all things preceived as given in life. This book will change how you preceive success.
 
 
Jun 7, 2013
If it is anything like Scott's blog, this book will teach you how to get the most out of your illusion of free will.
 
 
-1 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
This isn't one of those get rich quick schemes. This book will get you rich. Quick!
 
 
+2 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
While perhaps not in the same league as dancing monkeys, moist robots, and the Matrix, "How to Fail Almost Every Time and Still Win Big: Kind of the Story of My Life" is sure to be as amusing and interesting as everything else Scott Adams writes. Heck, it may even be useful.
 
 
0 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
Scot Adams's writing is always fun to read and thought-provoking. His non-intuitive advice about success is his blog posts is simply profound. This book not only collects his good advice in one place, it also solves a problem - what to give to the kids that are graduating from high school or college. No more pen and pencil sets from me; this is the new standard for graduation gifts!
 
 
Jun 7, 2013
Adams's steps to 'Still Win Big' are actually a viral download of his brain whereby he plans to extend his life - at least to the end of yours.
 
 
Jun 7, 2013
Scott Adams has an engaging writing style that forces readers to approach concepts and ideas from ways you wouldn't think possible. You almost can't tell he's a computer simulation of the real Scott Adams.....
 
 
-1 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
Can one man save the world? Maybe. Is Scott Adams that man? Probably not. But he does have a unique insight into the human condition and how we work - or don't.

I've been reading Scott's blog and comics for years and the only thing that I can guarantee about this book is that there will be parts of it that are so spot on about your life that you’ll look to see if he’s peaking in your windows and others that actually make you think - a rare commodity these days.
 
 
Jun 7, 2013
You will have heard of me after I read this book.
 
 
 
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