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Before you take on any challenge - whether you are planning a trip to someplace exotic, or contemplating a career change, or whatever - there is always a step you will do first if it is available to you: You'll ask other people how they did it. You probably won't follow the same playbook as those who went before, but knowing how others approached the same challenge, and how it turned out, will narrow your choices. And that can help a lot.

After Dilbert became a big deal, people started asking how I was able to beat such long odds. Was it simply a case of hard work plus extraordinary luck, or did I have some sort of secret method?

The interesting answer is that my career unfolded according to a written strategy that I created after I graduated from college. I still have it. And on top of the strategy I have several systems designed to make it easier for luck to find me.

Last year I realized that my personal story has just the right amount of twists and setbacks to make good reading. So I turned it into a book that will come out in October on the topic of success. The title is How to Fail Almost Every Time and Still Win Big: Kind of the Story of My Life. It's a non-Dilbert book that includes humor in some chapters, but it's mostly a very different approach to the topic of success. I wouldn't expect anyone to follow my systems and get the same results, but I think it is helpful to know which methods other people have tried and how it turned out for them.

Anyway, my publisher asked me about getting blurbs for the back cover. In publishing lingo, a blurb is a recommendation or positive review of the book that appears on the back cover, as in "A fantastic read. I couldn't put it down. - Joe Blow."

My problem with collecting blurbs in the usual way is that it feels like assigning homework to strangers. A typical blurb process might involve picking some famous authors in the success field and asking my publisher to ask their publishers to ask the famous authors to 1) Read my book, and 2) Write glowing reviews. The whole process feels wrong.

This is where you come in.

My publisher has agreed to print blurbs from you, my blog readers, knowing that none of you have read the actual book. What's in it for you is that you might see your name on the back cover of the book.

The trick is to write your review in a way that addresses my general writing/thinking qualities as seen on this blog. You won't be reviewing the book so much as reviewing me as a writer. Keep your reviews to a few sentences at most, and don't be so overboard that it looks disingenuous. The trick is to say something positive that isn't over the top. And don't pretend you actually read the book.

I'll select several winners from what I see in the comments and stick them on the book.

Who's in?

 
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Jun 7, 2013
My Blurb is
"Scott Rocks! Again!!"
 
 
+6 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
Master of modern communication -- short, to the point, and usually funny.
 
 
-1 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
If you believe the author believes what he claims to believe and already believe the author's beliefs, it is entirely believable.
 
 
Jun 7, 2013
Makes you think in ways you didn't know were possible.
 
 
+2 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
"Oh!"
Anonymous critic
 
 
+5 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
"mumble ... mumble ... funny ... mumble ... mumble ... mumble ... mumble ... thought provoking ... mumble ... mumble ... buy ... mumble ... mumble ..."
Olli the hired critic

 
 
0 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
"A no-read classic – I so much enjoyed not yet reading it."

"From wet fish to moist robot in !$%*! pages"

"A book with very few misspellings – thmubs up"
 
 
Jun 7, 2013
Scott believes we don't really exist, but if we did, we'd be robots. That philosophy has allowed him to back into success while staying true to a philosophy that joyously dismisses reality.

But hey, he's rich. So there might be something more than humerous entertainment to this book. Then again, if you believe that, it's possible that you can't tell a reasoned plan from dumb luck.
 
 
Jun 7, 2013
## Scott Adam's journey from the cubicle to the hacienda.

## Scott Adam stumbled his way to success. And now you too can do the same.

## Now you don't have to rise every time you fall. Scott Adam's step-by-step guide of how to descend into decadence.

## Scott Adam shows how to do everything wrong and still come out right.
 
 
+1 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
Scott Adams defies common sense in a way that makes one wonder what we were thinking.

-Red Yates
 
 
Jun 7, 2013
Always entertaining, Scott Adams takes a totally unconventional yet wholly logical approach to life and career. Prepare for a highly entertaining mix of story, insight, and humor.
--Sean McHale
 
 
0 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
"Absorbing as it is self-aborbed!"
Doug Ciskowski
 
 
+14 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 7, 2013
"Nobody is more qualified than this author to write this autobiography!"

or

"If I had to describe Scott's book in one word, I would have to go with 'entertaininginformativeinsightfulandthought-provoking."
 
 
-4 Rank Up Rank Down
Jun 6, 2013
Hey Scott -

What about a little post about the government - and it's abuse of power.

Oh - which one?

The whole NSA / spy thing. Yeah - it's one thing to do it under the covers. We've suspected for years.

BUT to openly come out and admit it - and then try to DEFEND it? Come on!

 
 
Jun 6, 2013
Scott’s thought provoking sentiments and often self-deprecating satire draws readers to naturally relate. With his hilarious illustrations of flawed conventional wisdom, Scott offers his readers an alluring escape from the mainstream world of self-help psychology.
-Eric Gauthier
 
 
Jun 6, 2013
A dark and mysterious, mystical journey through veils of enigmatic mystical mystery.

Mark Robinson
 
 
Jun 6, 2013
It's got to be better than his comics.

Mark Robinson

(Joke!)
 
 
Jun 6, 2013
I didn't buy this book and I'm only moderately successful. I think that's all the proof you need.

Mark Robinson
 
 
Jun 6, 2013
You know when you go to the dentists and they keep you waiting and their waiting room is full of real old magazines and the receptionist is the rudest person you've ever met until you actually meet the dentist who makes up all sorts of painful treatments you really don't need and charges you a fortune for them?

Yeah, this book is the opposite.
 
 
Jun 6, 2013
I have a dining table with one leg shorter than the other three. This book provided the perfect solution - now every meal times is a success! The interior is possibly quite reasonable.

Mark Robinson
 
 
 
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