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Jul 27, 2011
A nice last-frame Wally answer'd be: "Assuming the business is still yours."
 
 
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Jul 13, 2010
@OldPacBellDude...Mongobert concerned about you. Mongobert head hurt when he read your posts. Mongobert ask you to think before you post. Mongobert say boredom a terrible weapon to use.
 
 
Jun 2, 2010
Just like in Ironman, I must confess that I am Wally. Finally out of the closet....

I have been working for my current company for 10 plus years. It started off as an exciting place to work. The long hours were acknowledged with perks and stock options that made money.

Y2K came around, equipment could not be made or sold fast enough and the companies management swelled. The engineers that had made the company, were ignored and everything was focused on making money. Lots of acquisitions followed and the culture died a hideous death.

To survive in this environment, you had to become valuable, yet not expensive. Making sure to only do enough to keep up the mediocracy. Learning to latch on to projects were they were either destined to be a success or a failure became an art. Failures are a necessity as they are bleeded so your successful project is under budget. Periodically you need to find a human shield to take the blames & jump in to the spot light of the successes.

In between the successes & failures you drink lots of coffee, play solitaire and see whats popular at Youtube. You are in no hurry to retire as your 401K is Swiss cheese due to the constant economy roller coaster. The plus is its kind of funny to stay around and torture management. I'm very good at making the middle management run around like squirrels on fire.
 
 
Jun 2, 2010
Just like in Ironman, I must confess that I am Wally. Finally out of the closet....

I have been working for my current company for 10 plus years. It started off as an exciting place to work. The long hours were acknowledged with perks and stock options that made money.

Y2K came around, equipment could not be made or sold fast enough and the companies management swelled. The engineers that had made the company, were ignored and everything was focused on making money. Lots of acquisitions followed and the culture died a hideous death.

To survive in this environment, you had to become valuable, yet not expensive. Making sure to only do enough to keep up the mediocracy. Learning to latch on to projects were they were either destined to be a success or a failure became an art. Failures are a necessity to blame time on so your success is under budget. You just need to find a human shield to take the blame & jump in to the spot light of the success.

In between the successes & failures you drink lots of coffee, play solitaire and see whats popular at Youtube. You are in no hurry to retire as your 401K is Swiss cheese due to the constant economy roller coaster and have decided its kind of funny to stay around and see what you can do to make the middle management run around like squirrels on fire.
 
 
+5 Rank Up Rank Down
May 19, 2010
Here's another comic in which Dilbert and Wally are shirtless:

http://www.dilbert.com/strips/comic/2009-04-13/

I was thinking that a year or two ago, there was a series where all the guys were shirtless. They were all outside as well. Something to do with the recession and not being able to afford office space, furniture and clothes. Anyone care to grace us with a link to that comic?
 
 
 
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